Superwholockinist

kyssthis16:

Reasons why I Gus is a fucking gift.

(Source: samanthapanther, via frighteningfeminist)

“[I]t is actually more expensive to be poor than not poor. If you can’t afford the first month’s rent and security deposit you need in order to rent an apartment, you may get stuck in an overpriced residential motel. If you don’t have a kitchen or even a refrigerator and microwave, you will find yourself falling back on convenience store food, which—in addition to its nutritional deficits—is also alarmingly overpriced. If you need a loan, as most poor people eventually do, you will end up paying an interest rate many times more than what a more affluent borrower would be charged. To be poor—especially with children to support and care for—is a perpetual high-wire act.”

It Is Expensive to Be Poor | The Atlantic  (via america-wakiewakie)

Reblog this forever. I’ll never forget how many of my students in the school I worked in with a 100% free and reduced lunch rate lived in residential motels and how many of them relied on the school to get breakfast and lunch and how often those were their only meals for the day.

Or how my friends who have older cars have to spend so much money repairing them but an older car was all they could afford in the first place.

And how you literally have no safety net because if you already fixed one thing on your car and something else goes a week later, you’ve already spent the little bit of buffer you saved up.

(via stfufauxminists)

(via ladyshinga)

If privileged women were as likely to do survival sex work as they are likely to get an abortion, there would be no feminist debate on sex work

loriadorable:

[I’m about to talk about women here because women make up the super majority of survival sex workers and people who have had abortions, and I want to acknowledge that this is a gendered issue. Please note, however, that there are a number of men and nonbinary people who also do both.]

The parallels between abortion and survival sex work are staggering:

  • It’s no one’s first choice to have an abortion or do survival sex work.
  • It only happens because other options have failed.
  • Other options fail in large part because society refuses to provide them.
  • Some women find abortion traumatic. Some women find survival sex work traumatic. Some don’t much mind.
  • Some women who have had abortions go on to advocate for the criminalization of abortion. Some women who have done survival sex work go on to advocate for the criminalization of sex work. Most do not.
  • Many anti-abortion advocates believe that punishing doctors and not patients is a sensible solution. Many anti-sex work advocates believe that punishing clients and not workers is a sensible solution. In both cases, it is simply a method of backdoor criminalization of the women.
  • Opponents of both point to the disproportionate number of poor women of color who have abortions/ do survival sex work as proof that abortions/ sex work are a form of racist + classist violence, instead of proof that poor women of color are less likely to have other options thanks to systemic racism + classism.
  • Opponents of both point to the fact that some women are forced to have abortions/ do sex work as proof that it needs to be criminalized, ignoring that criminalization makes it harder to track these women down.
  • No current sex worker or woman who currently needs an abortion advocates for its criminalization.
  • Opponents of both classify it as violence against women and an example of patriarchal control of women.
  • Opponents of both confuse prohibition with abolition. Prohibition of both fails to decrease the number of survival sex workers/ women seeking abortions but increases the amount of harm done to them.
  • Opponents of both refuse to employ harm reduction methods, even though they’re the only ones proven to work.

The only reason why there’s a feminist ‘debate’ over criminalizing sex work instead of advocating for decriminalization, harm reduction, and the provision of other options, is because privileged women are so incredibly unlikely to have to do survival sex work. They can *afford* to focus on their icky feelings and desire to punish the clients, because it’s not their lives that are at stake.

toss-some-jello-trossarello:

strawberry-squidd:

toss-some-jello-trossarello:

Oh.. Seems pretty violent ..

Go ahead. Watch it. Prove your doubts.

I take everything back. That was horribly scarring. And yet, I can’t stop watching.

toss-some-jello-trossarello:

strawberry-squidd:

toss-some-jello-trossarello:

Oh.. Seems pretty violent ..

Go ahead. Watch it. Prove your doubts.

I take everything back. That was horribly scarring. And yet, I can’t stop watching.

(via carry-on-my-wayward-butt)

ami-angelwings:

freedominwickedness:

hyenaboy:

Yes, being in a female dominated field, I do know what it means to be marginalized. “

oh

my

god

omg

oh my fucking god

The really ugly part is they’ve actually done multiple sociological studies on this, and guess what the result is? Men in female-dominated fields aren’t marginalized at all; they get special treatment and are fast-tracked to the top, getting more credit for their work, faster promotions, and greater pay and benefits than their female colleagues.

Here’s one study. Here’s another. And another.

I’ve actually experienced this myself.  When I was read as male I worked in women’s clothing stores and departments, and rather than treat me as less knowledgeable, customers assumed I was MORE knowledgeable and preferred to talk to me because they assumed that if men (or people they perceived as men) were in a “women’s” field, they must be REALLY qualified.  Sometimes they would assume I was the manager.  And I really didn’t know anything, but they took my word as gospel.

The opposite is true now, when people read me as a woman and I’m doing something computer related.  Despite that that IS something I have a background in, people tend to assume I don’t know anything, are skeptical at what I say, and prefer to get a man to help them, because they feel more confident in what he says, even if it’s wrong. 

In my experience, people don’t assume that women in male dominated fields must be there because they have superior knowledge or ability, they assume they’re the weakest link in the chain.  But for men, they assume they must be the strongest link to have made it in.  Regardless of whether a field is male or woman dominated, the ideas we have in society about men being more knowledgeable, rational, able to solve problems, determined, and as the most reliable narrators still persist. 

(via carry-on-my-wayward-butt)